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Patrick Messerlin

Email: patrick.messerlin@gmail.com


Patrick Messerlin

Patrick Messerlin is Chairman of ECIPE’s Steering Committee/Advisory Board, Professor emeritus of economics at Sciences Po Paris, and Director of Groupe d’Economie Mondiale (GEM) at Sciences Po since its creation in 1997.  GEM is an independent research unit seeking to improve the performance of French and European public policies in a global world.

From 1986 to 1990, Patrick Messerlin was a Senior Economist at the Research Department of the World Bank.  In 1990, he joined Sciences Po as a Professor of economics.  He was also a visiting professor at the University of Houston (Texas, USA), Simon Fraser University (British Columbia, Canada), Johann Wolfgang Goethe Universität (Frankfurt Am Main, Germany) and Keio University (Tokyo, Japan).  He has written many books and articles on his areas of expertise.

In 2001-2002, Patrick Messerlin was a special advisor to Mike Moore, the WTO Director General.  He also served as a member of the Preparatory Conference to the G7-G8 Summits (a group of independent persons gathered by the Peterson Institute for International Economics and the Tokyo Foundation).  In 2003-2005, he co-chaired with Ernesto Zedillo, Director of the Yale Center for the Study of Globalization, the Task Force on “Trade for Development” for the Millennium Development Goals of the United Nations.  In 2008-2011, he also co-chaired with Ernest Zedillo the joint World Bank & UK Department for International Development Task Force on Global Finance and Trade Architecture.  In 2009-2012, he was a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Trade Council, which he chaired in 2010-2011During all these years, he has been a consultant to many international organizations, governments and firms.    

  • Korea Project

    The myth of subsidies in the film industry: a comparative analysis of European and US approaches

    By: Jimmyn Parc Patrick Messerlin 

    It has been widely believed that subsidies can help revive film industries, but the link between the intent and the actual results deserves more careful scrutiny. This paper addresses this issue by comparing and analyzing Europe and the United States. Originally, Europe’s subsidies were developed to increase the number of film productions, but they soon became ineffective and were largely exploited by Hollywood as a way to circumvent European protectionist...

  • Korea Project

    Overcoming the Incoherent ‘Grand Maneuver’ in the French Film and TV Markets: Lessons from the Experiences in France and Korea

    By: Jimmyn Parc Patrick Messerlin 

    In 1989, the Member States of the European Union integrated their TV markets together in order to create a larger and more open ‘single TV market’ through the Television without Frontiers Directive. The French film industry used this opportunity to extract additional revenues by implementing TV quotas and strengthening the chronologie des medias. This paper examines the impact of these two measures on the French film and TV industries and shows how they were...

  • Korea Project

    The Korean film industry: a “game changer”

    By: Patrick Messerlin 

    Sweden and Korea have a very different approach to the film industry. Having a small domestic market, the Swedish film industry tends to see its comparative advantage in deepening its long tradition of producing “art movies” competing in festivals. In short, it has faced Hollywood dominance by cultivating different types of films. The Korean film industry has been impregnated with the US film tradition, with its first afterwar generation of film-makers —...

  • Korea Project

    Building Consistent Policies on Subsidies in the Film Industry: Institutions and Instruments in France and Korea

    By: Patrick Messerlin 

    This paper explores a much-neglected aspect of cultural policies: the role of the institutions in charge and the way they use the instruments at their disposal. It focuses on the film industry which offers the remarkable contrast on how the Korean film industry has outperformed the French one in less than twenty years. This paper provides three conclusions. First, it presents an economic analysis of the French and Korean institutions which shows that building a...

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