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There is a compelling global narrative which argues we are missing a major economic opportunity when it comes to ex… https://t.co/OCs3HxldpGMissed our webinar on EU Strategic Autonomy? 👀No problem, you can re-watch it here 📺https://t.co/NFAxSr0gB5 https://t.co/4xPW7KiBRe📢New policy brief! 🧐Learn more about the importance of #MRA's by @Lucian_Cernat 🔗https://t.co/WBB7DI3qvq… https://t.co/A1KL1xiVBu“Many of IRA policies that take a ‘America first’ attitude will hurt competition and EU firms, especially in sector… https://t.co/Wnuj5UdtYJThe #D9+ initiative should focus on expanding the scope of digital technological change in the EU economy while add… https://t.co/7nXbYdyzz0
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Lucian Cernat


Lucian Cernat is the Head of Global Regulatory Cooperation and International Procurement Negotiation at the European Commission. Until 2008, he held various positions at the United Nations in Geneva dealing with trade and development issues. He has authored more than 20 publications on the development impact of trade policies, WTO negotiations, EU preferential market access, regional trade agreements, competition policy, corporate governance. Prior to his UN experience, he has been a Trade Diplomat with the Romanian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, and part of the negotiating team of bilateral FTAs with the EuroMed area and Baltic countries, preceding Romania’s accession to the EU. Lucian Cernat obtained a PhD from University of Manchester and a postgraduate diploma from Oxford University. He is also the author of Europeanization, Varieties of Capitalism and Economic Performance in Central and Eastern Europe (Palgrave Macmillan, 2006).

  • ECIPE Policy Briefs

    How Important are Mutual Recognition Agreements for Trade Facilitation?

    By: Lucian Cernat 

    Trade in the 21st century may face lower tariffs, but regulations that affect international trade in goods and services have proliferated. While regulations are important for many public policy objectives, different and complex non-tariff measures can become unnecessarily costly trade barriers for the millions of companies engaged in international trade. Trade policy can play a crucial role in reducing these unnecessary costs, without impairing the ability of...

  • ECIPE Policy Briefs

    Has Globalisation Really Peaked for Europe?

    By: Lucian Cernat 

    This paper builds on the recent arguments put forward by Richard Baldwin and others debunking the myth that we enter a period of de-globalisation. The paper argues that globalisation is a complex phenomenon that requires detailed, firm-level indicators going beyond simple aggregate metrics. When using such indicators, the picture is much more nuanced and, in the case of Europe, the role of global trade is as important as ever for hundreds of thousands of companies...

  • ECIPE Policy Briefs

    Processing Trade and Global Supply Chains: Towards a Resilient “GVC 2.0” Approach

    By: Lucian Cernat 

    In the current global context marked by economic fragility, growing uncertainty and geopolitical conflicts, ensuring the smooth functioning of global supply chains becomes more important than ever. Supply shortages, higher freight costs, higher commodity prices and strong demand increase will trigger inflationary pressures for all economic sectors dependent on global value chains (GVCs). As part of global efforts to enhance the resilience of GVCs, this paper makes...

  • ECIPE Policy Briefs

    From SMEs to Unicorns: What Role for Trade, Standards and New Tech?

    By: Lucian Cernat 

    The global economy has been shaped by important, disruptive technological changes in recent years. Many of these technologies have been instrumental in our global COVID-19 response and will become the new normal. Some of these technologies have been introduced by small firms, which grew spectacularly to become ‘unicorns’, with very high market value and global reach, setting new technological standards in their sectors. The future competitiveness of the EU...

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