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🌎🚢 IP-intensive sectors export 68% of all EU exports. Stronger IP provisions in EU FTAs can lead to an increase of… https://t.co/Nr6oolhcYJ"The same hawks who are usually (and rightly) dogmatic about Chinese market distortions are now fiercely advocating… https://t.co/SGZ8FU3RMiIs China closing itself? How are new business restrictions causing friction? What are the secrets for success in Ch… https://t.co/RVXLXdyxUq"In the debate about shortages and trade dependencies, which is legitimate and relevant, international trade has be… https://t.co/VQrq5gY4GK"A lack of regulatory cooperation on #cybersecurity standards and certification requirements may become one of the… https://t.co/sSPomqMQ6s
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Erik van der Marel

Email: erik.vandermarel@ecipe.org

Office: +32 (0) 2 289 1350 Mobile: +32 (0) 499 053 104

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Areas of Expertise: EU Trade Agreements Services Digital Economy WTO and Globalization Russia & Eurasia

Erik van der Marel

Erik van der Marel is a Senior Economist at ECIPE, Associate Professor at the Université Libre de Bruxelles, and Consultant Economist at the World Bank. His areas of expertise are in digital trade, services trade, cross-border data flows, and their associated digital services trade policy.

Prior to his appointment at ECIPE, Erik was a full-time lecturing at the London School of Economics (LSE) where he taught international trade at post-graduate level. In the past, Erik also gained various professional experience as a consultant at the, OECD, APEC, ADBI, and the World Bank Trade Research Department. Erik received his PhD in economics from Sciences-Po Paris and did his post-doctorate at the LSE, too.

Erik has published peer-reviewed journals, book chapters, working papers and reports, and made contributions to ECIPE, the World Bank, and ADBI on digital trade and services, domestic regulations in digital services trade and data flows. He has also provided various capacity building courses for policy makers at National Ministries and taught at the European University Institute (EUI) and World Trade Institute (WTI).

To access personal website of Erik go here.

  • ECIPE Occasional Papers

    The Benefits of Intellectual Property Rights in EU Free Trade Agreements

    By: Fredrik Erixon Oscar Guinea Erik van der Marel Philipp Lamprecht 

    Key Takeaway 1: What are Intellectual Property Rights and why do they matter? Intellectual Property gives the creator (e.g. an artist, a company doing R&D, indigenous peoples, a creative studio) an exclusive right over the commercial use of that intellectual creation for a certain period of time. IP motivates people/companies to invest in innovation by providing the opportunity to recoup the investments made. By motivating such new discoveries, innovations and...

  • ECIPE Policy Briefs

    Taxing Digital Services – Compensating for the Loss of Competitiveness

    By: Erik van der Marel Peer Schulze 

    Several countries around the world have implemented a tax on digital services, commonly called Digital Services Tax (DST). This policy brief takes a closer look at why some European countries have imposed DSTs but not others. Surely, there are economic explanations behind the fact that Austria, France, Italy, Spain, and the UK have introduced DSTs – but not other countries in Europe. The five tax-imposing countries (here called DST5) have been losing trade...

  • New Globalization

    Regulating the Globalization of Data: Which Model Works Best?

    By: Erik van der Marel 

    Novel flows that define the future of globalization require new regulatory approaches, which are likely to differ between countries. So too for regulatory approaches to personal data. Globally, there are three different regulatory models for personal data: the model applied by the US, based on an open approach to transfer data and process data locally; the model developed by the EU, which is a model based on so-called conditional transfers and processing; and...

  • New Globalization

    Globalization Isn’t in Decline: It’s Changing

    By: Erik van der Marel 

    Globalization isn’t in decline; it is simply changing. Although the COVID-19 crisis has seen a dramatic decline in goods trade, investments and the movement of people, a new type of globalization is emerging. This “new globalization” is based on digital services, research and development, data, ideas, and other intangibles. This development has been going on for a while and has evolved more rapidly after the previous global financial crisis (GFC) in 2008-9....

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