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Stephen Ranger

Email: stephen.ranger@ecipe.org

Office: +44 7754293998

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Areas of Expertise: Far-East

Stephen Ranger

Stephen Ranger is a Research Associate at ECIPE. His research interests are focused on North Korea, major trends in U.S.-China Relations, South Korean political issues, and security policies in the Asia-Pacific region. From 2009 to 2013, he was a researcher for the MacArthur Asia Security Initiative project at the East Asia Institute based in Seoul, South Korea. He holds a master’s degree in International Studies from the Graduate School of International Studies, Seoul National University.

 

  • Korea Project

    Target Hollywood! Examining Japan’s Film Import Ban in the 1930s

    By: Stephen Ranger 

    In the 1930s Hollywood enjoyed a popular following in the Japanese film market, accounting for almost 90 per cent of imported sound films. Against a backdrop of emerging political tensions and war in China, the Japanese government announced in 1937 that it would place a ban on Hollywood film imports. This was a move that ushered in a new era of protectionism for Japan’s emerging film industry. Following this decision, Hollywood studios engaged with Tokyo and...

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