Miriam L. Campanella

Email: miriam.campanella@unito.it

Office: +39 01 19 60 91 36


Areas of Expertise: European Union Eurozone Crisis North-America Russia & Eurasia South Asia & Oceania

Miriam L. Campanella is Senior Fellow at ECIPE and Jean Monnet professor at the University of Turin. Between 1980 and 1994, Professor Campanella was based at the MIT Centre for International Studies, researching general system analysis and the economics of complex systems. In 1988, at the peak of her fascination for theories of complex systems, she published the book Between Rationality and Cognition: Policy-making under conditions of uncertainty, complexity, and turbulenceFollowing a sabbatical leave, Professor Campanella got involved in the process of European integration, with a special focus on the European Monetary Union and the inter-institutional tensions evolving between the European Central Bank and the Euro Group. In 2003, she co-edited the book EU Economic Governance and Globalization.

Research and teaching activities intensified in the 1990s. With a Fulbright Professorship at the University of Pittsburgh, and a Jean Monnet chair at the University of Turin, she run courses earmarked to European Erasmus students. In 2001, however, she left academia for an appointment at the Ministry of Economy and Finance in Rome. As adviser at the economic council of the Minister’s cabinet, she advised to governments on issues like corporate tax harmonization, financial budget reform, financing of European public goods, and last but not least the economics of the Kyoto Protocol. After her departure from government service, Professor Campanella has returned to research and led comprehensive research programmes on the shift of financial power to new players in Asia, with a special focus on East Asian financial integration, and China’s role in the region and on the global stage.

  • ECIPE Policy Briefs

    Financial Repression and the Debt Build-up in China: Is There a Way Out?

    By Miriam L. Campanella

    China’s old recipe book for economic success, based on market distorting policies, is hindering the process toward a market-driven economy and the chance of being granted Market Economy Status (MES). The consequences of policy passivity may derail China into the middle income trap and pose severe uncertainty to global markets. As China’s debt keeps mounting,…

  • ECIPE Policy Briefs

    Turning China’s Money Reserves into Capital

    By Miriam L. Campanella

    Some economies in East Asia have built up large amounts of foreign exchange reserves in the past decades. Holding large amounts of reserves helped these economies to stabilize their macro economy and exchange rates under periods of market stress and rapid shifts in relative economic size. Generally, it has been a strategy to provide a…

  • ECIPE Working Papers

    The Internationalization of the Renminbi and the Rise of a Multipolar Currency System

    By Miriam L. Campanella

    The dollar’s steady depreciation has had little impact on the official reserves of central banks. As scholars of the international monetary system debate whether the dollar can continue to play the dominant role in the international monetary system, actual developments in exchange relations already give reason to expect that the world’s currency regime is changing.…

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