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The Future of China’s Trade and Role in Global Production Networks

February 25 2010
Venue: ECIPE Office, Rue Belliard 4-6, 7th Floor, Brussels
Speakers: Ari van Assche, HEC Montreal
Time: 13:00

ECIPE Lunch Seminar

Speaker; Ari van Assche, HEC Montreal

China’s trade success is a function of processing trade – that is, China became an assembly hub that processed imported components before they were exported. But the economic crisis has affected China’s trade performance – possibly also in the longer run. How exactly is the crisis affecting China’s trade? Is China really climbing the technological ladder? What impact do these trends have on global production networks, and what are therefore the implications for trade and investment policy?

These issues will be discussed by Ari van Assche, a professor of international business at HEC in Montreal and expert on China’s trade performance, at an ECIPE seminar.

RSVP by February 24 to info@ecipe.org

 A sandwich lunch will be served.

A limited number of seats are available.

Location