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Should Europe really worry about its trade deficit with China?

April 15 2008
Venue: Hotel Euroflat: Boulevard Charlemagne 50, 1000 Brussels, Belgium
Speakers: Dr. Andreas Freytag
Time: 10:30

ECIPE invites you to a lunch discussion on EU-China trade and economic relations. In a new paper ECIPE’s Senior Fellow Andreas Freytag has analysed trade data to get a better understanding of what has happened in EU-China trade relations over the last decade. The result is surprising and challenges the established view that the soaring bilateral deficit is explained by currency manipulation.

In
Europe criticism of China’s rising clout in the global economy, of its
undervalued currency, and of Europe’s rising bilateral deficit has become
shriller by the day. It has been used by European leaders for more or less
overt threats to use protectionist measures against Chinese imports. Europe’s
trade deficit with China has been described as a “policy time bomb”. But are
there reasons to be worried? Is Europe’s bilateral trade deficit with China
essentially explained by an artificially low exchange rate?

In a new
paper ECIPE’s Senior Fellow Andreas Freytag has analysed trade data to get a
better understanding of what has happened in EU-China trade relations over the
last decade. The result is surprising and challenges the established view that
the soaring bilateral deficit is explained by currency manipulation.
Furthermore, a closer look at the macroeconomics of EU-China economic relations
gives further reasons to avoid using trade deficits as a material ground for
protective measures.

ECIPE
cordially invites you to a lunch discussion on EU-China trade and economic
relations, lead by Dr. Freytag.

Power Point presentation by Andreas Freytag>


Location