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London Seminar – EU Taiwan Relations – Geopolitical and Economic Challenges

February 25 2010
Venue: London School of Economics, Houghton Street, London WC2A 2AE, UK. Graham Wallis Room (AGWR), Old Building, 5th floor
Speakers: Jonathan FenbynAlexander NeillnLinda YuehnRazeen SallynGuy de Jonquières
Time: 10:00

Joint Event - LSE-International Trade Policy Unit and ECIPE

Taiwan’s position in the international economy has undergone dramatic transformation. From low-cost manufactured goods exporter in the 1980s, Taiwan has become one of the biggest foreign investors in booming mainland China. Its role in “Factory Asia” is pivotal. But the rush to free trade agreements in Asia challenges this position. 

The island’s uncertain political status limits its ability to respond with diplomatic action. Political relations with the Mainland, after years of turbulence following the island’s democratisation and its fluctuating attitudes towards political independence have recently stabilised, and an agreement aimed at normalising economic relationships is progressing. Taiwan is in parallel attempting to deepen its economic and political ties with its main trading partners, not least the European Union. How are they likely to be affected by changing cross-Straits relations, and by Taiwan’s wider East Asian relationships? What are the prospects, opportunities and challenges for closer EU – Taiwan relations? 

These deeply interrelated geopolitical and economic issues will be discussed by prominent experts on Taiwan and the European Union during a roundtable this coming 6th of May at the London School of Economics. You are very welcome to join us.

Panellists:

  • Jonathan Fenby, Journalist and Historian
  • Alexander Neill, Head, Asia Programme, Royal United Services Institute
  • Linda Yueh, Director of the China Growth Centre and Fellow in Economics, St Edmund Hall, University of Oxford
  • Razeen Sally, London School of Economics

Moderator: 

  • Guy de Jonquières, Senior Fellow, ECIPE

RSVP to j.p.lamprecht@lse.ac.uk before May 4, 2010

Limited Seats Available

Location