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ECIPE Roundtable: Global Business and the Future of Trade Policy

March 04 2012
Venue: ECIPE, Rue Belliard 4-6, Brussels
Speakers: Ari van Assche, Per Altenberg, Fredrik Erixon, Razeen Sally
Time: 14:30

Trade liberalisation in the post-war era was to a large extent driven by mercantilist instincts. A provocative observation for a free-trade purist, perhaps. Nonetheless, successful forms of negotiated trade liberalisation were based on an exchange of “concessions”, or reciprocated market access for exporters. The modern world economy, however, does not operate in accordance with the mercantilist textbook. The past decades of globalising supply chains have made it difficult to distinguish the national identity of a product and what exactly represents an export gain.

What is and should be the impact on the design of trade policy from the new world of trade? And is there a politically feasible case to be made for trade-negotiation agendas that reflect the realities of global business today rather than a mercantilist mindset? Or does successful trade negotiations still need to rely on that mindset – but be adapted and applied differently than in the past?

You are welcome to join us for a thought-provoking afternoon roundtable about the future design of trade policy. The discussion will be kicked off by remarks from Ari van Assche from HEC Montreal, Per Altenberg from Sweden’s National Board of Trade, and ECIPE Directors Fredrik Erixon and Razeen Sally.

The meeting will be followed by a wine reception.

Location