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A German Agenda for its G-8 Presidency

January 26 2007
Venue: ECIPE, Rue Du Luxembourg 3, Floor 1, Brussels
Speakers: Sir Nicholas BaynenDr Andreas FreytagnDr Werner MusslernDr Razeen SallynMr Lutwin Strauch
Time: 14:00

On January 1st, Germany assumed the leadership of the Group of Eight
(G-8), the economic policy forum for eight large economies in the
world, as well as that of the EU. Germany’s Presidency coincides with a
formative period in German foreign economic policy. Its overall
mission, ensuing the fall of the Berlin Wall, was the peaceful
transition to democracy and market economy for the former communist
countries in Eastern and Central Europe. This was the ‘bread and
butter’ of all Germany’s foreign economic policy and a natural
corollary of Germany’s post-war strategy.

But today, when Konrad Adenauer’s and Helmut Kohl’s agendas have
been achieved, indeed successfully so, what is the long-term strategy
for Germany’s foreign economic policy? Will Germany use the G-8
Presidency to signal strategic priorities and a leadership role in
international economic policy? How can Germany avoid the claptraps and
windy rhetoric that often encircle summit meetings in order to develop
a sober, balanced, and decisive agenda that will get results? On what
issues can Germany, as G-8 President, ‘add value?’

Location