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ECIPE Lunch Seminar: Global Supply Chains, Asia, and Europe. Trade Policy Implications of China’s and Europe’s Integration into Regional and Global Supply Chain Networks

October 14 2008
Venue: ECIPE’s offices, Rue Belliard 4-6, 7th Floor, 1040 Brussels, Belgium
Speakers: KC Fung, Professor of Economics at UC Santa Cruz and Visiting Professor at Hong Kong UiniversitynRazeen Sally, Director ECIPE
Time: 11:00

In the past decades, China has become a major hub of international trade
and inward foreign direct investment (FDI). Its economy is now deeply
integrated into today’s ever-shifting international supply chains in
manufacturing, and has considerably altered today’s global production networks.
Since the 1990s, Central and Eastern European economies have also seen a shift
of FDI and trade from the older European Union member states, often with
similar patterns of comparative advantage as China. Are the shifting trade and
investment patterns in Europe and China mutually exclusive, unrelated or
complementary? Does the EU have a trade policy adapted to the realities of
today’s fast-changing global supply chains? How do its policies compare with
the United States’?

It is with great pleasure that I invite you to join us in a discussion on these
issues with KC Fung, Professor of Economics at UC Santa Cruz and Visiting
Professor at Hong Kong Uiniversity. Professor Fung is one of the leading
international specialists in the economics of supply chains and related trade
policies in Asia/Pacific. His recent academic research involves comparative
analysis with Europe. He is a current advisor and academic collaborator at the
US International Trade Commission (USITC). He served on the President’s Council
of Economic Advisors during the Bush and Clinton administrations, handling US
trade policy.

A light lunch will be served
Limited space available.

RSVP by 10
October 2008 at info@ecipe.org

Location