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ECIPE’s Asian Policies Lecture, Asia’s Rise in the 21st Century: Can Asian Institutions Support It?

October 23 2008
Venue: Hotel Sofitel, Place Jourdan 1, Brussels, Belgium
Speakers: Shri Arun Shourie, Former Minister, Government of IndianSimon Long, Asia Editor, The EconomistnRazeen Sally, Director, ECIPE
Time: 15:00

The weight of the world is inexorably shifting East. Asia is set to produce more than half the world’s Gross Domestic Product by 2030. To some commentators, China, and perhaps India, will eclipse the West, become “great powers” and assume leadership in global political and economic relations. But are China, India and other Asian nations ready to take on the domestic and international challenges of this “Rise of the Rest”? Can current economic growth trajectories be sustained by domestic institutions that are still underdeveloped and slow-moving? What about Japan — still the leading economy in Asia? Will China, India and other Asian nations assume greater leadership in global economic institutions such as the WTO, IMF and World Bank? What are the consequences for the West?

These issues will be debated in the first of a new series of Asian Policies Lectures hosted by ECIPE. Our guest speaker will be Shri Arun Shourie, former Minister in the Government of India, 1998-2004. He was the leading policy reformer in that government, and spearheaded the deregulation of the telecommunications industry — one of the landmark successes of India’s post-1991 market reforms. Dr. Shourie, a former World Bank economist, has long been one of India’s prominent journalists, intellectuals and politicians. Simon Long, the Asia Editor of The Economist, and Razeen Sally, Director of ECIPE, will provide further insights into the debate.

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RSVP By October 22 to ECIPE: info@ecipe.org

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