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ECIPE Lunch Seminar: How to Make a New Climate Agreement Possible? An Asian Perspective

June 17 2015
Venue: ECIPE, Rue Belliard 4-6, 1040 Brussels
Speakers: Suh-Yong Chung
Time: 12:30

How could a new climate agreement be designed in order to enrol the support of key Asian economies?

The Paris climate summit later this year has been labelled a make-or-break meeting for of a new global accord on managing and reducing carbon emissions. While the fault lines between different countries have been known for long and visible at previous summits, it is less obvious how the views of different countries can be accommodated in on agreement. With the rapid rise of Asia – the participation of key Asian economies in a new climate deal would be a prerequisite for getting an agreement in the first place. But what are views from Asia about how to design a climate agreement?

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Programme

Presentation by Suh-Yong Chung, Professor of International Studies at Korea University and a leading scholar of the laws and institutions of climate change and sustainability. He has advised governments and international organisations, and he was a member of the Presidential Committee on Green Growth in Korea.

Location